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Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

5 edition of Shinto, the way of Japan. found in the catalog.

Shinto, the way of Japan.

Floyd Hiatt Ross

Shinto, the way of Japan.

by Floyd Hiatt Ross

  • 258 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Beacon Press in Boston .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Shinto

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 175-176.

    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBL2220 .R6
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxvii, 187 p.
    Number of Pages187
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5942690M
    LC Control Number65013533
    OCLC/WorldCa374886

    Shinto - The Way of Gods: Introduction to the traditional religion of Japan (Book) Book Details. ISBN. Title. Shinto - The Way of Gods: Introduction to the traditional religion of Japan. Author. Miller, Vincent. Publisher. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform. Publication Date. Buy This Book. This book provides a lively introduction to the study of language for students without prior experience in linguistics. It addresses the core areas of language study answering questions such as: This text is designed to allow the intermediate/advanced student to read Latin rapidly, without having.

    Shinto the Kami Way Kami and the Yaks Occult Japan: Shinto, Shamanism and the Way of the Gods Shinto Shrines: A Guide to the Sacred Sites of Japan's Ancient Religion The Yengishiki or Shinto Rituals (Forgotten Books) A Popular Dictionary of Shinto Religions of the World -. Shinto is the traditional religion of Japan. Unlike many other religions, Shinto does not have a founder or a sacred book like the Bible. Unlike many religions, Shinto has no founder, no holiest place and no fixed set of prayers. Shinto gods are called are sacred spirits which take the form of things in the world around us like wind, rain, mountains and trees.

      Shinto, or The Way of the Gods, is a religious practice that dates back to B.C. Japan is still dotted with shrines to the Kami, or gods of Shinto. Kami . Shinto, also known as kami-no-michi, is a religion originating from Japan. Classified as an East Asian religion by scholars of religion, its practitioners often regard it as Japan's indigenous religion and as a nature religion. Scholars sometimes call its practitioners Shintoists, although adherents rarely use that term themselves.


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Shinto, the way of Japan by Floyd Hiatt Ross Download PDF EPUB FB2

The author describes a Shinto shrine: examines the basic myth of creation and the Shinto conception of deity which has grown out of it.

Festivals and rites are detailed, as well as the ultimate merging of religion and politics during the Meiji period and the state of Shinto today. Read more Read less Cited by: 8.

Shinto is Japanese for ‘The way of the Gods.’ Shinto represents Japanese religion and cult that has its origins in prehistoric times. Referred to as the ‘indigenous faith of the Japan’ - the belief occupies a significant position even in the technologically advanced modern Japanese society/5(10).

Shinto: The Way of Japan Hardcover by Floyd H. Ross (Author) out of 5 stars 1 rating. See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ $ $ Hardcover: $ 5/5(1). Shinto, the indigenous faith of the Japanese people, continues to fascinate and mystify both the casual visitor to Japan and the long-time resident.

Relatively unknown among the religions of the world, Shinto: The Kami Way provides an enlightening window into this Japanese faith. In its general aspects, Shinto is more than a religious by: The book does thoroughly discuss Shinto philosophy however, and explains the interesting fact that although the Western world regards Shinto as a religion, the Japanese generally don't.

It also explains in detail how a philosophy essentially based upon an appreciation of life, beauty, and mystery could be distorted by the state into a force that drove Japan to declare bloody war on the rest of the by: Shinto, the Kami Way "continues to fascinate and mystify the casual visitor to Japan." I found this book a fascinating and mystifying glimpse into the Kami way.

I think the Kami would be pleased/5. This book was written by a non-Japanese author, which could have its problems, but I felt like it was much more of If everything make sense, there is no room for awe.

I read a different book about Shintoism last year, and although it was informative, it focused very strongly on the rituals and practices of Shinto, and not on the experience/5.

Shinto: The Way Home is a broad overview, situating Shinto in the context of Japanese culture and history and of broader approaches to spirituality and religion. It avoids being trapped in any narrow conception of Shinto, whether confessional-dogmatic or Orientalist-romantic. Kasulis begins with elements of Shinto that are accessible to outsiders, with "the experience of wondrous mystery" and.

Shinto has held sway over the religious, social, and political way of life in Japan for over two millennia and continues its reign over the minds of the Japanese even today. The Kami Way in Shintoism is a personal faith in the objects of worship and a belief in noble and sacred spirits.

Buy the Hardcover Book Shinto, The Way Of Japan by Floyd H. Ross atCanada's largest bookstore. Free shipping and pickup in store on eligible orders. This study presents the force of Shinto and the human mood, feelings and value-nuances which perpetuate it.

It is the religion of indigenous Japanese people. The beauty of Shinto is that peace and harmony are revered among all energies of life and death and being in nature means being close to the Kami, the gods. The way to the gods with Shinto is by upholding family values, loving and honoring nature, physical cleanliness, and regular worship.

Shinto, the way of Japan. [Floyd Hiatt Ross] This study presents the force of Shinto and the human mood, feelings and value-nuances which perpetuate it. Book: All Authors / Contributors: Floyd Hiatt Ross. Find more information about: ISBN:   This book is "Shinto: The Kami Way" by the Shinto priest and scholar Sokyo Ono, in PDF, EPUB, and AZW3 formats.

Book Description: Shinto, the indigenous faith of the Japanese people, continues to fascinate and mystify both the casual visitor to Japan and the long-time resident. Occult Japan book. Read 3 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Shinto, or The Way of the Gods, is the oldest religious faith of the J /5.

Shinto, the indigenous faith of the Japanese people, continues to fascinate and mystify both the casual visitor to Japan and the long-time resident. Relatively unknown among the religions of the world, Shinto: The Kami Way provides an enlightening window into this Japanese faith.

In its general aspects, Shinto is more than a religious faith/5(3). Shinto, the way of Japan. Boston, Beacon Press [] (OCoLC) Online version: Ross, Floyd Hiatt. Shinto, the way of Japan. Boston, Beacon Press [] (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Floyd Hiatt Ross.

Shinto holy books. The holy books of Shinto are the Kojiki or 'Records of Ancient Matters' ( CE) and the Nihon-gi or 'Chronicles of Japan' ( CE).

These books. Condition: New. Paperback. Shinto, the indigenous faith of the Japanese people, continues to fascinate and mystify both the casual visitor to Japan and the long-time resident. This introduction unveils Shinto'ng may be from multiple locations in the US or from the UK, depending on stock availability.

pages. texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection. National Emergency Library.

Top Shinto, the way of Japan by Ross, Floyd Hiatt. Publication date Topics Shinto Publisher Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press CollectionPages: Shinto as a faith is inherently Japanese, but, as this book is keen to make clear, that doesn’t mean it lacks relevance for the rest of the world.

We can learn from Shinto – learn about the possible forms religions can take, about ways of relating to the spirit world, and different ways of thinking/5. shinto, the way of japan: by ross, floyd h. praeger. hardcover. first printing runs good to very good. owner name on front end piece. not ex-lib or remainder marked.

whole cover with minor flaws and no stickers. newspaper articles included and has underlining and margin comments throughout. no dj. see photos if available.

pa   Shinto ("the way of the gods") is the indigenous faith of the Japanese people and as old as Japan itself. It remains Japan's major religion alongside Buddhism. Introduction. Shinto does not have a founder nor does it have sacred scriptures like the sutras or the Bible.Shrines were seen as an extension of government and Shinto was seen as a way of unifying an otherwise fragmented Japan.

With the Meiji restoration, Shinto was used to boost nationalism. After WWII, many new religions appeared, but Japan’s religiosity decreased. Shinto shrines were mostly seen as a way to help ordinary people obtain better luck; and many people claimed to not be religious, even .